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Disruption or Disintermediation? The Nature of Change of Our Changing Nature.

The use of the word ‘disruption’ to describe the changes brought about by the ubiquity of computational devices and connectivity to the internet has become cliché. The term is useful in that it provides a rhetorical safety net by simultaneously describing everything and nothing, but its lack of precision inhibits technologists from achieving the goal […]

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When the U.N. Clashes with the Internet: The Crisis of Legitimacy of Representation

My latest blogpost comes via the World Economic Forum’s Blog. In it I discuss the crisis inherent in the recent conflict between the International Telecomunications Union and the members of the internet. I also discuss how this crisis manifests itself in both the news media as well as the private sector. Check it out here: […]

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Disrupting the Hospitality and Food Industry Through Crowd-Sourcing Economic Activities

Growing up in the province of New Brunswick, Canada I was keenly aware that one family, the Irving family, owned and operated most industry. Whether it be oil/gasoline/ forestry/paper products/transportation of people and goods/media, whatever industry the Irving’s chose they generally weren’t satisfied until vertical integration was complete. In the case of transportation, for example, the Irving’s owned […]

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Podcast Interview With Jorge Soto, Co-Founder of CitiVox

Interview With Jorge Soto

Here it is: my first ever self-produced podcast! I feel very fortunate that I regularly get to meet fascinating people doing amazing things to improve the state of the world. Jorge Soto is one of them and thus a fitting subject fora podcast. Jorge is the 27 year old co-founder of CitiVox, a Mexican Start-Up that uses technology to help citizens engage with government. Some of their projects include election monitoring, tracking of violence against journalists in Northern Mexico, making governments accountable to citizens, etc. 

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Why Revolutions Fail

An abridged version of this post exists for those less interested in reading about my personal connection to the topic. You can find it here. As a young man growing up on the far eastern edge of the North American continent, I hadn’t much experience of the outside world beyond the borders of the Canadian […]

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Why Revolutions Fail (Abridged)

This is an abridged version of a longer essay. You can find the original here. After dedicating a good chunk of the time and energy of my adult life to the idea of revolution I have come to an uncomfortable conclusion. I say “uncomfortable” because my current beliefs undermine a lot of my past beliefs […]

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The Role of Government in the Era of Crowdsourcing

My post this week comes via the World Economic Forum’s blog. Today I am discussing the changing role of government in the era of crowdsourcing. You can find the original post here: When the SpaceX Dragon Capsule touched down last week in the Pacific Ocean after its successful unmanned mission to the International Space Station, it brought […]

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Digital Democracy Series: Can ubiquitous connectivity make political parties obsolete?

If I think ahead into what I want the world to look like in 30 years, one of my hopes is that connectivity will be so ubiquitous that we no longer need political parties to act as the primary means through which we practice democracy. I say ‘practice’ democracy because democracy is, like the act of […]

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Taking Steps Towards Digital Democracy

The single most difficult concept for many people to grasp when discussing the possibilities of the future is the idea that as our innovations evolve so too does the context that enables those innovations. For example, when Google made public its self-driving car a lot of people scoffed at the idea that such a machine-driven […]

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